Biden will allow at least 10,000 deported asylum seekers to RETURN

Thousands of asylum-seekers whose claims were dismissed or denied under a Trump administration policy that forced them to wait in Mexico for their court hearings will be allowed to return for another chance at humanitarian protection, the Homeland Security Department said Tuesday.

Registration begins Wednesday for asylum-seekers who were subject to the ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy and either had their cases dismissed or denied for failing to appear in court, The Associated Press reported.

Under that criteria, it is unclear how many people will be eligible to be released into the United States pending a decision on their cases, according to a senior Homeland Security official who spoke on condition of anonymity because the announcement had not been made public.

Thousands of asylum-seekers whose claims were dismissed or denied under a Trump administration policy that forced them to wait in Mexico for their court hearings will be allowed to return for another chance at humanitarian protection, the Homeland Security Department said Tuesday. A child is seen in a tent in Reynosa, Mexico, earlier this month

Thousands of asylum-seekers whose claims were dismissed or denied under a Trump administration policy that forced them to wait in Mexico for their court hearings will be allowed to return for another chance at humanitarian protection, the Homeland Security Department said Tuesday. A child is seen in a tent in Reynosa, Mexico, earlier this month

Thousands of asylum-seekers whose claims were dismissed or denied under a Trump administration policy that forced them to wait in Mexico for their court hearings will be allowed to return for another chance at humanitarian protection, the Homeland Security Department said Tuesday.

A child is seen in a tent in Reynosa, Mexico, earlier this month

But Michele Klein Solomon, the International Organization for Migration´s director for North America, Central America and the Caribbean, told the AP that she expected at least 10,000. 

Her organization is working closely with the administration to bring people to the border and ensure they test negative for COVID-19 before being allowed in the country.

The estimate seems low.

There are nearly 7,000 asylum-seekers whose cases were dismissed – the vast majority in San Diego – and more than 32,000 whose cases were denied, mostly in Texas, according to Syracuse University’s Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse. 

It is unknown how many cases were denied for failure to appear in court.

Registration begins Wednesday for asylum-seekers who were subject to the 'Remain in Mexico' policy and either had their cases dismissed or denied for failing to appear in court

Registration begins Wednesday for asylum-seekers who were subject to the 'Remain in Mexico' policy and either had their cases dismissed or denied for failing to appear in court

Registration begins Wednesday for asylum-seekers who were subject to the ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy and either had their cases dismissed or denied for failing to appear in court

Many are believed to have left the Mexican border region, thinking their cases were finished, raising the possibility that they will make the dangerous trek to return. 

The official said the administration is aware of those dangers and considering bringing people to the United States, as it is doing to reunite families that remain separated years after Trump’s ‘zero tolerance’ policy on illegal crossings.

The move is another significant effort at redress for Trump policies that Biden administration officials and their allies say were cruel and inhumane and defenders say were extremely effective at discouraging asylum-seekers from coming to the U.S.

Biden halted the policy his first day in office and soon allowed an estimated 26,000 asylum-seekers with active cases to return to the United States while their cases play out, a process that can take years in a court system backlogged with more than 1.3 million cases. 

More than 12,300 people with active cases have been admitted to the U.S.

since February, while others who have registered but not yet entered the country bring the count to about 17,000.

That still leaves out tens of thousands of asylum-seekers whose claims were denied or dismissed under the policy, known officially as ‘Migrant Protection Protocols.’ 

Advocates have been pressing for months for them to get another chance, but the administration has been silent, leaving them in legal limbo.

 

Migrant children are being kept in Biden’s border camps for up to 60 DAYS, are ‘sad every day’ and have limited access to showers and cooked meals, lawsuit claim 

Migrant children housed in U.S.

pop-up shelters reported overcrowding and long stay times, spoiled or undercooked food and lack of access to showers or clean clothes, according to testimonials filed in court Monday.

Seventeen minor migrants shared accounts with lawyers of their time in emergency shelters after crossing into the U.S.

unaccompanied by adults. Some reported depression while others described trouble sleeping with round-the-clock bright lights.

A 13-year-old girl from Honduras wrote that she was placed on the suicide watch list at a shelter in El Paso, Texas set up at Fort Bliss.

As of June 4, the girl spent nearly two months at the facility after being separated from her father when crossing a river into the U.S.

‘The food here is horrible,’ she wrote. ‘Yesterday we were given hamburgers but I couldn’t eat it because there was a foul odor coming from the bread.’

‘I really only eat popsicles and juice because that is the only food that I can trust.’

Migrant children in emergency holding facilities, including a massive one at Fort Bliss in Texas, detailed deplorable living conditions including spoiled or undercooked food in testimonials as part of a court filing Monday

Migrant children in emergency holding facilities, including a massive one at Fort Bliss in Texas, detailed deplorable living conditions including spoiled or undercooked food in testimonials as part of a court filing Monday

Migrant children in emergency holding facilities, including a massive one at Fort Bliss in Texas, detailed deplorable living conditions including spoiled or undercooked food in testimonials as part of a court filing Monday

Demonstrators outside Fort Bliss on June 8 demand the children be let out of the facilities as more details emerge of long stay times - sometimes exceeding several months - and limited communication with family

Demonstrators outside Fort Bliss on June 8 demand the children be let out of the facilities as more details emerge of long stay times - sometimes exceeding several months - and limited communication with family

Demonstrators outside Fort Bliss on June 8 demand the children be let out of the facilities as more details emerge of long stay times – sometimes exceeding several months – and limited communication with family

The shocking declarations come as hundreds of illegal crossers continue to flow over the southern border from Mexico. Here migrants board a bus overnight June 21 to be taken to a processing facility after crossing the Rio Grande into the U.S.

The shocking declarations come as hundreds of illegal crossers continue to flow over the southern border from Mexico. Here migrants board a bus overnight June 21 to be taken to a processing facility after crossing the Rio Grande into the U.S.

The shocking declarations come as hundreds of illegal crossers continue to flow over the southern border from Mexico.

Here migrants board a bus oJune 21 to be taken to a processing facility after crossing the Rio Grande into the U.S.

In May, U.S. Customs and Border Protection encountered 180,034 illegal crossers at the southern border, the most of any month so far

In May, U.S. Customs and Border Protection encountered 180,034 illegal crossers at the southern border, the most of any month so far

In May, U.S.

Customs and Border Protection encountered 180,034 illegal crossers at the southern border, the most of any month so far

Joe Biden’s administration promised in March that migrant families won’t spend more than 72 hours in U.S.

facilities, but unaccompanied minors, on the other hand, shared declarations of months inside emergency shelters in deplorable conditions.

Several claim they have been at the shelters for 60 days or longer.

Lawyers were given access to speak with children in these facilities as they monitor government compliance with the Flores Settlement – a 1997 agreement governing conditions for which detained immigrant children can be kept.

The team of attorneys have interviewed children and conducted site visits at the emergency shelters, which were originally intended for short stays.

‘Every day, I feel really sad.

I keep seeing other kids leave,’ a 16-year-old from Guatemala being housed at a facility in Pecos, Texas said in a declaration filed Monday.

She has been at the site for 62 days waiting for reunification with her uncle in Maryland.

‘There are some other kids who have been here for about the same time as me, and Sbobet Bola there is just a lot of sadness among us,’ she said in a testimonial on her time in an emergency facility.

One Response to Biden will allow at least 10,000 deported asylum seekers to RETURN

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